Dating vintage photos

15-Nov-2017 00:47

Tintype portraits were at first usually made in a formal photographic studio, like daguerreotypes and other early types of photographs, but later they were most commonly made by photographers working in booths or the open air at fairs and carnivals, as well as by itinerant sidewalk photographers.Because the lacquered iron support (there is no actual tin used) was resilient and did not need drying, a tintype could be developed and fixed and handed to the customer only a few minutes after the picture had been taken.The areas with the least amount of silver, corresponding to the darkest areas of the subject, were essentially transparent and appeared black when seen against the dark background provided by the lacquer.The image as a whole therefore appeared to be a dull-toned positive.It began losing artistic and commercial ground to higher quality albumen prints on paper in the mid-1860s, yet survived for well over another 40 years, living mostly as a carnival novelty.

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It captured scenes from the Wild West, as it was easy to produce by itinerant photographers working out of covered wagons.In both processes, a very underexposed negative image was produced in the emulsion.Its densest areas, corresponding to the lightest parts of the subject, appeared gray by reflected light.In 1856 it was patented by Hamilton Smith in the United States and by William Kloen in the United Kingdom.It was first called melainotype, then ferrotype by a rival manufacturer of the iron plates used, then finally tintype.

It captured scenes from the Wild West, as it was easy to produce by itinerant photographers working out of covered wagons.In both processes, a very underexposed negative image was produced in the emulsion.Its densest areas, corresponding to the lightest parts of the subject, appeared gray by reflected light.In 1856 it was patented by Hamilton Smith in the United States and by William Kloen in the United Kingdom.It was first called melainotype, then ferrotype by a rival manufacturer of the iron plates used, then finally tintype.Sometimes the camera was fitted with a mirror or right-angle prism so that the end result would be right-reading.